All posts by Matthew Pegg

Birmingham Literary Festival

Mantle Lane Press is running an event at the Birmingham Literary Festival.
Birmingham Repertory Theatre, The Door. Saturday 28th April. 12:30-1:30.

More information and booking details on the festival site here.

The event will be a launch of three new books: Always Another Twist by Sarah Leavesley, The Music Maker by Liz Kershaw, and our anthology of weird sea stories It Came from Beneath the Waves. It will also celebrate our previous publications including the anthology Mrs Rochester’s Attic.

There will be readings from:
Jennifer McClean
Liz Kershaw
Nick Fogg
Sarah Leavesley
Sue Barsby
Tim Franks
Valentine Williams

 

Facebooktwitter

Always Another Twist

Our latest small book, Sarah Leavesley’s novella, Always Another Twist, will be available from 30th April 2018.

Listen to Sarah reading from the book here:

 

Always Another Twist is a companion story to Kaleidoscope, also published by Mantle Lane Press. It tells the story of Julie, sister of Claire from the earlier book, and her problems with work and her own pregnancy. How can she tell Claire, who is receiving psychiatric treatment after her own loss and heartbreak?

Facebooktwitter

Mantle Arts

Mantle Arts is an arts organisation based in Coalville, Leicestershire.

Red Lighthouse is Mantle’s programme of writing and literature projects, which includes participatory activity with schools, libraries and local communities, plus support and development for new and established Midlands-based writers.

Mantle Lane Press is our publishing arm which specialises in fiction and factual historical books, usually with a Midlands connection.

Wolves and Apples 2016 programme launched.

Wolves & Apples is a conference for aspiring writers producing work for children and young adults. It’s a chance to take part in workshops and attend talks and discussions by professional authors, publishers and agents from the children’s book industry.

The full Wolves and Apples 2016 programme is now available. See details here:
Wolves and Apples Programme and Timetable.

October 15th. College Court Conference Centre, Leicester.

Or buy your ticket here: Wolves and Apples Tickets

 

Facebooktwitter

‘What Haunts the Heart’ event at Birmingham Literary Festival

Our anthology, What Haunts the Heart is featured in the programme of the 2016 Birmingham Literary Festival. The event takes place on October 9th at 2pm in Waterstones, High Street Birmingham.

Many of the writers featured in the book will be present at the event to read their work, including William Gallagher, Liz Kershaw and Fiona Joseph.

More information and booking details here: www.birminghamliteraturefestival.org/event/what-haunts-the-heart/

Facebooktwitter

And in other news…

We’re delighted to be working with Rob Gee as our Writer in Residence in the villages of Castle Donnington and Moira. Rob’s workshops for our schools’ writing project Act Out… Write Up, were a great hit with the kids, who enjoyed seeing their work directed and performed by professionals at Curve Theatre. Rob is currently touring Canada with Icarus. As if that isn’t enough, we’re publishing more copies of his book Forget Me Not, due to high sales after his tour of the show earlier this year. At the heart of Forget Me Not is a detective whose tool of the trade – his mind – is failing him, making the most important case of his life something of a challenge to solve. By turns hilarious and thought-provoking, this is a one-man comedy poetry theatre show that has a lot to say about how we treat and perceive people with dementia. So much so that, since seeing the show, Leicestershire Partnership NHS Trust have recruited Rob to work with healthcare staff, using Forget Me Not as a training aid in the areas of compassion and whistleblowing. Buy your copy here

BOOK NOW: Wolves & Apples is back on October 15, 2016
Liz Flanagan will be running a session on how to kickstart your book if you have a great idea but aren’t quite sure how to get going. Throughout the day there will be exercises designed to generate exciting ideas and characters, and help you structure your story. Whether you are writing for teenagers or younger children, a detailed planner or like to wing it, this session will equip you with the tools you need to make a start.

NEW SPEAKER ADDED
We are delighted to add Elys Dolan to our list of guests at this years Wolves & Apples, a day offering lots of tips, advice and guidance for anyone writing for children and young people. Click here to book your place.

How can authors can promote their books online, a question that has loomed large ever since online self-publishing started to take off. Anyone can get their book out there – but without the backing and budget of a publishing house, how can they market it effectively?

OPPORTUNITY: Call out for performers and aspiring radio techies. No previous experience required!
Working with BBC director Martin Berry we’re producing an audio dramatisation of William Wordworth’s life in North West Leicestershire. He wrote a number of poems at Coleorton and, with his sister Dorothy, created the Winter Garden. The contrast between his poetry, his love of beauty and the reality of working life in the area – which was dirty and dangerous – make this a fascinating chapter of history, highlighting aspects of class

Facebooktwitter

‘Wolves and Apples’ panel discussions.

Two panel discussions will top and tail our ‘Wolves and Apples’ event on October 3rd.
WHY WRITE FOR CHILDREN?
10:15-11:00

The opening discussion will introduce the event and our guest speakers and touch on some key aspects of creating work for children and young adults.

Possible Areas of Discussion.

  • How and why did the panel begin writing for children and young adults?
  • What are we trying to achieve by creating work for young audiences?
  • What are the pitfalls and advantages of working in this area?
  • More girls than boys read. Does that matter and how does it affect the choices one makes as a writer?

Q and A.
The panel will end with an opportunity to ask questions of our speakers.

A WRITING CAREER
16:00-16:50

The closing discussion will be focused on professional development for writers. Collectively the panel has experience of publishing, writing, producing, directing, show running, and representing writers.

Potential Areas of Discussion.

  • Developing a viable career: not putting all your eggs in one basket.
  • Understanding how different industries (e.g. Theatre, publishing, TV) operate and work with writers.
  • Presenting and submitting your work – best practice.
  • Where to get further advice, support and help.
  • Dos, don’ts and next steps.

Q and A
The discussion will end with a final opportunity to ask questions of our speakers.

Facebooktwitter

3 question interview: Debbie Moon

Here is the fourth micro interview with guests who will be speaking at our upcoming  Wolves and Apples event. Wolfblood’s Debbie Moon answers our three searching questions.

1. What was your favourite book when you were a child, and why?
The Grey King, by Susan Cooper. A heady mix of Welsh myth and legends in a 1970’s setting, full of dark lords, strange boys with golden eyes, magical creatures, and a powerful sense of the landscape of north-west Wales. It had such a profound impact on me that I ended up moving to Wales as an adult!

2. What is your top writing tip?
The best advice I was ever give was “don’t get it right, get it written”. A completed story gives you security. You can rewrite, reorganise, throw out whole sections, and yet always have the original version to refer to or revert to. A half-written story can’t be polished or perfected, because you don’t know what it is yet. So get it finished, however terrible you think it is, and then you can whip it into shape.

3. What is the best thing about writing for children?
Probably their enthusiasm for stories. Children experience so much of the wider world through stories, and they embrace them passionately, and get very attached to characters and relationships within them. Adults may treat television as wallpaper, there but ignored: children almost never do.

 

Facebooktwitter